The Sage

President Trump: A Year In Progress and Controversy

Left photo ( take from Wikimedia Commons); right photo (taken from Flikr); center photo (Wikimedia Commons)

Left photo ( take from Wikimedia Commons); right photo (taken from Flikr); center photo (Wikimedia Commons)

Darius Rahmanian, Copy Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






One year has passed since the inauguration of the 45th President of The United States of America. Donald J. Trump’s term has stirred up some controversy to say the least, with 90 percent of media coverage of his term so far being negative.  For a change we are going to focus on the  aspects of Trump’s supposedly “tyrannical regime” that are at least more positive than negative, and the unique year we have had so far as a nation.

Personally, I have gone from undecided to supportive of our President’s actions. Apart from my own political journey, you can’t help but get annoyed after the “he orange, that funny” joke has been repeated millions of times across hundreds of media platforms. The rise of the “progressive” left and its illogical ideals has begun to push me to the right step by step. To this day I still believe Donald Trump’s politically incorrect bravado was still the lesser of two evils when compared to Clinton’s wishy-washy political past.

I see no reason to actively hate a man who wants to better this country and its holdings. In order to increase our nation’s sovereignty and right to protect itself, Donald Trump has had to build the wall (in a more metaphorical sense now than it will be) which has in turn become the vortex of the firestorm that is American politics. In the beginning of the year it was understandable, there were the triggered, the enraged and the misinformed. Everyone knew if Trump was to win that there would be mass protest and it happened as planned. Protesters screeched about fascism and how they were going to impeach Trump. It created considerable tension within many communities at the outset of the year. Many, many videos can be found of delusional protesters from both the RESIST and ANTIFA movements conducting levels of damage unprecedented in elections before as they compare a moderate conservative to a National Socialist.  Even at the inauguration protesters screamed in anger as Americans elected their President as they have done for the past 236 years.

Inaugurations are supposed to be a time of victory and setting the stage for the term of any President; instead, the feeling of victory was replaced by a sense of antagonism and vilification as protesters screamed and ranted at those who simply had another ideology than they. Protesters screamed at those who were fed up with corruption, who felt like they had been underrepresented the past eight years, who felt they themselves found a leader that emboldened the American bravado and brashness. Instead they were vilified on an international stage, corrupting their hearts with a hatred for other Americans who deemed them “deplorables,” a label proudly worn by all those who support the current President of the United States of America.

The swirling wind of the firestorm was continuously fanned by the mainstream media, spreading falsities and corrupt stories diverting the American people even further. This all happening within the first few months of inauguration proved that maybe 2017 was going to be rougher than the now historic year behind it.

Coming to Terms: A Year in Legislation and A DACA Debacle

As for the first year in office, in terms of legislation, the first big event was the travel ban agenda. Even in our own school, students created disruption during school hours with a protest that continued through lunch. Witnessing the debacle for myself, many seemed to misunderstand the point or even the countries being banned from entry. The protest proved useless and led many students to leave campus for the sole purpose of leaving rather than thought out political action. Tests and labs were disrupted and so on, leaving the students of Sage Creek with a bad taste in their mouths.

All around the nation the debate around national sovereignty vs. global collectivism sparked debate in classrooms, family outings and public places. President Trump stood by his agenda and recently the Supreme Court upheld it on a national level. Many argued that it was unfair to ban an entire nation while the other side argued for national security and the protection of our people.

It was also a year of great sadness and reconstruction after three massive hurricanes hit the American and Puerto Rican coasts. In a time of great strife, Americans came together in order to rebuild and provide for each other. Neither Democrats or Republicans came to criticize in this time of need. For once in a long while, we all forgot about the mire of politics.

Short-lived, the cease fire came to a close. The DACA ordeal erupted shortly after. President Trump repealed legislation that protected children who had been brought to US illegally by their parents. President Obama signed the bill, after Congress denied it, making it seem to some like a forced executive action rather than the will of the people. The way that President Trump went about the repeal was brash and unexpected. No political buildup, no belated debate within the Congress, just a simple revoke of legislation. However, the President’s original intentions were overshadowed by the enraged establishment.

In order to force congress to pass bipartisan legislation for the DACA kids, he revoked DACA to put congress on a clock. If Republicans and Democrats were able to come to an agreement in which both agendas for immigration and reform would come to fruition, Americans could have a defined policy to look to. The way President Trump went about it, however, is an issue. The straightforward and politically incorrect nature of President Trump kept its stay with the abrasiveness in which it was repealed. No lead up, no discussion, just a repeal and a lot of angry protesters to be had. The repeal was neither mature or official for our President to do as such.

As the DACA debacle continued, it raised awareness for the need of a strong border so children did not have to suffer for the mistakes of their parents, as well as with implementation of Trump’s campaign promise of the wall and comprehensive reform. Even as of Jan. 2018, talks have only begun on both sides and hopefully a solution that many Americans can agree on will be reached by the middle or end of the year.   

Trump’s tax reform passed through Congress and is aiming to bring companies back to American soil and to encourage long term investments. The tax reform has been the most successful thing so far, even with the dwindling Republican majority within congress. Going hand in hand with Trump’s promised isolationist policies on sparking American industry over international trade, there could be substantial growth in the coming years or at least the platform to build off of.

The year in legislation was constantly marred by the slim majority’s fight against the vicious minority, halting long term legislation and creating a muck of political spite. It seems to many conservatives that Democrats are holding half the nation hostage both politically and socially, with their anger based upon party lines rather than their love for their nation.

Rising Tension: The War Between Establishment and The People

Meanwhile, the overarching comedy show that was the Russia collusion investigations persisted throughout the year, more prominent at the beginning of 2017 and picking up when Democrats heard about Trump Jr.’s meeting with Russian lawyers, eventually dying down once more. It is possibly the biggest waste of the federal government’s time and resources. It was supposed to be a sucker punch after Clinton’s loss but never amounted to anything. Trump may have won, but the Democrats and chided media tried their best to get rid of him. As the stories progressed, media giants hungered lustfully for details on either side. Whether Fox or CNN, they grabbed at the retreating sands of a story that had no real evidence behind it in the first place. Much like when a joke hits the mainstream, the media took a crackpot theory and blew it up to massive size where they could take every little morsel and get those last licks in.

Surprisingly, previously trusted print publications, such as the New York Times, Huffington Post, and Wall Street Journal became the spearhead against Donald Trump. Instead of reporting the news as they should be, the sites became swamped with propaganda and angry rants against whoever they could target. Taking a look at New York Times’s collection of articles, it seems blissfully unaware of its own critical faults in journalism. Especially during the Charlottesville event, instead of objectively looking at the scene and reporting on how both ANTIFA and the original protesters were funnelled together to cause calamity, they instead capitalized on the situation and began using tag words like “White Supramcist,” “Nazi,” and “Confederate,” all to stir up trouble and get those precious clicks. After researching multiple sources, even primary sources, one would come to a conclusion that the “Neo-Nazi” and “Neo-Confederate” presence was relatively small to the general population of the Unite the Right rally.

The violence at Charlottesville ended with the death of a protestor, finally snapping everyone to common sense. President Trump’s now famous line, “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides. It’s been going on for a long time in our country.” Somehow this spurred on the left even more. The President addressed both sides, since both sides were accountable for the fighting, yet the hungry crowds were not appeased. The media tried to dupe us, and those smart enough to do their own research found that it was the right-wingers who were being repressed and assaulted, that their voice was not given a chance to be heard. Instead they glorified Communists and Socialists that wanted to tear down America, but who just happened to be on the opposing side.

It seems like Donald Trump cannot do anything right in the eyes of the media. He could donate a million dollars to charity and the media would spin it as a coverup or some malicious attack. For heaven’s sake, he ate two scoops of ice cream and Stephen Colbert and CNN went on a rampage. He drank water with two hands and suddenly, “THE PRESIDENT IS UNFIT FOR OFFICE;” it’s all honestly very annoying and disheartening.

Unfortunately, travesty struck the United States once again with the mass shootings in Texas and Las Vegas. With it spurred on the ever continued gun control debate (a topic already covered here in The Sage), which ultimately brought Americans together once again. Both sides criticized, but the tragedy was just too great to continue the childish political mudslinging and the people looked towards a brighter tomorrow rather than a toxic future.

Making America First: The International Stage and Donald Trump

Internationally, America began its political assault unto North Korea, a bastion of anti-western ideals and constant threat for war. There was no doubt in any American’s mind that we could wipe North Korea off of the face of the earth, but ultimately President Trump’s tweets would have to do. While Kim Jong Un basically said “YOU OLD!” to President Trump during the UN Conference, the UN in turn restricted even more resources to the belligerent nation. As quick rebuttal, Trump responded with “rocket man” and during the end of the year the he mentioned his “bigger button.” This back-and-forth political mudslinging is nothing short of a spectacle to watch and at the same time readies the American mindset for a war we may not want to fight.

The War Against ISIS was also concluded on the Iraqi front at the tail end of 2017 with the assistance of U.S. advisors and an unwise supply of arms to insurgent anti-ISIS groups in the area. Mosul and Raqqa were recaptured but with heavy domestic loss and the complete and utter destruction of both cities. However, it was claimed as a victory and the Middle East, and with support from Coalition forces, can hopefully be one step closer to shaky peace.

In terms of relations with other countries, Great Britain seems to enjoy America’s fresh new demeanor and has also sparked a wave of conservatism and their own hotly-debated Brexit and Election Cycle. With the rest of its “allies,” Trump’s tweet concerning Pakistan summed up his thoughts on the leeches that take from America and give nothing back and even in some cases have harbored terrorist leaders in the years past. Emmanuel Macron, of France has also softened to Trump as he showed a revitalized interest in “France First.”

Our biggest strain is with Germany, possibly the strongest political nation in the EU. Chancellor Merkel has announced her utter disdain for Trump and in some cases has been relabeled the Leader of the Free World as her country is being bombarded by migrants who refuse to convert to western culture and ultimately selling out the German people.

Poland and Eastern Europe have an extreme love for the US as both an ally and nation. Their fiercely independent nature and resounding resolve in the face of the EU resonates with American values and the fight for national sovereignty in the face of collective globalism.

Russia has kept its distance as it always has, and with the collusion affairs, one can still see a smile on Putin’s face. Trump over the past year has actually avoided contact with Russia outside of G20 and the United Nations, as not much has come after the earlier problems with the Syrian Civil War.

China as well, has encouraged the US as a trading partner and does not want to risk war. Both are mutual frenemies, as the US dollar is heavily reliant on China and their manufacturing. The rest of Asia (even Vietnam) still has  respect for America and ultimately remains steadfast dependents and allies to the United States.

One Year, One Vision, One America

Our enemies few, and our allies strong, there seems to be no overt threat to the United States other than itself. A problem only its people and history itself can sort out. With 2017 over and 2018 starting, so does the second year of President trump’s first term. One can only imagine what is to come. A rough road lays ahead; supporter or not, Donald J. Trump is America’s President. We must all learn to make peace with those who have angered or berated us. Coming to terms and creating compromise is what Republican Democracy is all about, a nation for the people and by the people. I firmly believe that President Trump has been doing his job; not every president is perfect all the time no matter what Time or Wall Street Journal say. As we all get that feeling of old world blues, wanting the past to come back, we can mold our future, as long as we do it the American way as our forefathers intended it. Politics or not, America is still “one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

17 Comments

17 Responses to “President Trump: A Year In Progress and Controversy”

  1. Ian Pankey on January 29th, 2018 11:15 am

    Great piece, Darius.

  2. Donovan Birch on January 30th, 2018 7:51 am

    The whole thing over politics is ridiculous. In my view, its wiser to support policies and standpoints rather than politicians. Trump isn’t a bad president, the main thing that people have against him is that he can be rude(and, well, he is; insulting people, mocking a disabled reporter, for example.). If you think that Trump’s every move is the end of the world, than you should really re-examine your thoughts. If you think everything Trump does is the best thing ever, same goes for you. Whether you like it or not, he is out president, and we’ll just have to figure out how to make the best of a bad situation.

  3. Eleni Mowery on January 30th, 2018 11:19 am

    This article is great! Thanks for defying the echo-chamber. Too many people’s political opinions come from jokes and social media posts instead of real facts and knowledge of policy. I also agree with your stance on DACA and border security, it seems very well-researched. Someone needs to give our president the credit he deserves, even though he is far from perfect.

  4. Owen Horne on January 30th, 2018 12:17 pm

    Why are all the sage opinion post either really trivial or hyper conservative? Is it to much to ask for a more diverse set of opinions rather than a constant slew of hard right columns?

  5. Joey Babcock on January 30th, 2018 1:39 pm

    TheSage doesn’t censor anyone’s opinions, so if you would like to read more left leaning opinions, encourage left-leaning authors to write them. Otherwise, I wouldn’t consider Darius’s work or opinion to be “hard right” in the slightest.

  6. Charlie Lewis on January 30th, 2018 2:27 pm

    I agree with joey. While darius certainly stands out against the mostly left leaning Californians, he is not hard right. If anyone who goes against your held beliefs is hyper conservative, you may need to re-adjust your scale.

  7. Darius Rahmanian on January 30th, 2018 3:12 pm

    “Hard Right” is the worst way to describe my political leaning. Hard Right leans closer to the one part state and Monarchism than it does my views. Go and listen to SagePOL Episode I Parts I and II to really discern what my political viewpoints are. My article touches on my own view points here or there but essentially it is a over view of what happened the year before. Comments like this don’t have any constructive criticism and trying to force diversity never helps either. Join The Sage and bring what seems to be your own diverse understandings of American politics while also trying to create an article that carries more value than just a comment. You are completely welcome to submit your own stories to be published on The Sage as well as to voice your concerns but do so in a way that promotes change rather than apathy. Thank you.

  8. Owen Horne on January 31st, 2018 1:13 pm

    While I am always happy to engage in a political discourse I find your definition of hard right somewhat lacking, as you seem to be describing totalitarianism or absolutism, which are ideologies that defy a simple left-right definition. Today, hard right is generally regarded as a form of anti-liberalist (classical liberalism) politics often with a nationalist and deregulatory impulse, and a distrust of external actors. Thank you.

  9. Darius Rahmanian on January 31st, 2018 5:02 pm

    Definitions aside, If you see a severe lack of “diversity” write a couple articles and submit them to The Sage. This has been the only national politics related since the Tax Plan article last year, which took a more neutral stance than anything. There are only a few “political” writers on The Sage staff which ultimately restrains us to covering general events and not every single thing Trump does. I took great pride in creating a message that supported not only my view of last year but a view that was a positive outlook rather than the echo chamber that can be school politics. If you want to debate email me about SagePOL, I’d glad to debate someone willing to tell me about how “it wasn’t real communism” or how “He Drumpf and he racist”

  10. Ian Pankey on February 1st, 2018 9:00 am

    Hard right today means that someone has the most extreme political views of the right. You state that it is comparable to classical liberalism, which is a more moderate right-leaning ideology in the perspective of the current political climate.

  11. Owen Horne on February 1st, 2018 12:40 pm

    While I’m mildly alarmed at the amount of bile generated by two fairly moderate comments, I’d like to address some replies. Firstly, I think you many have misread what I said, Ian, I didn’t say that hard right thought was akin to Liberalism, but rather defined by its opposition to liberalism. Also, although it’s always a pleasure to have my intelligence demeaned, I’ll take your recommendations to heart. However, your characterization of me as some sort of communist moron is, while heart warming, perhaps not the best way to conduct a civil discussion.

  12. Joey Babcock on February 1st, 2018 1:57 pm

    Please comment under your real name, we cannot accept comments under false names (I’m referring to your comment on a different article but it was deleted so I responded on this one).

  13. David Fosman on February 2nd, 2018 8:21 am

    *takes AP Euro once*

  14. Sam Bodnar on January 30th, 2018 8:49 pm

    Darius… this is probably your best piece of writing I have ever seen! Fantastic growth in your ability to articulate your ideas/ opinions.

    Joey: solid commenting/ suggesting as well!

  15. Connor on February 1st, 2018 9:19 am

    Awesome article! It summarizes all of the 2017 events well and tries to be balanced on the spectrum. An article like this deserves to be in an official news site or paper.

  16. Jack G on February 1st, 2018 12:51 pm

    It seems to me that Trump has helped out country (as much as I hate to admit). The economy has done well under Trump, however his other policies feel less successful. The ban on immigration, net neutrality, and twitter war all are prime examples of this. I think Trump’s views are clashing with most Americans, as the writer said himself the only reason he supported Trump was because of Hillary. But at the same time Trump has helped the economy, so only time will tell how his presidency will be remembered.

  17. Darius Rahmanian on February 1st, 2018 3:08 pm

    The 4 pillars of Immigration is actually one of the best ways to solve the immigration loop holes and awful system we have now. I did not touch much on my own views as much but I support our President a lot more than the “average” Sage Creek student, for this article I simply put away my views and brought an objective and summary style look at 2017. Thanks for your constructive comment

The Sage intends for this area to be used to foster healthy, thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to our standards and to be respectful and constructive. As such, we do not permit the use of profanity, foul language, personal attacks, or the use of language that might be interpreted as libelous. Comments are reviewed and must be approved by a moderator to ensure that they meet these standards. The Sage does not allow anonymous comments, and The Sage requires a valid email address. The email address will not be displayed but will be used to confirm your comments.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




The Sage Publication
President Trump: A Year In Progress and Controversy