Moon Knight: An Intersection of Marvel and Egyptian Mythology

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Photo Taken From IMDb.com

Moon Knight in full costume stands in front of the moon. Moon Knight’s two separate identities both have different costumes, Spector’s more ancient one and Grant’s more modern suit.

Marvel’s newest streaming series, “Moon Knight,” was released on March 30 and is already delivering an interesting and fresh story to MCU fans. The series surrounds Steven Grant (Oscar Isaac), an English museum gift shop worker experiencing strange gaps in his memory. We come to learn that these gaps are the result of his alter ego, Marc Spector, with whom he shares a body, and that Spector is actually the avatar of Khonshu, an Egyptian deity of justice. 

Unlike Marvel’s previous series’, “Moon Knight” follows a lead character that is brand new to the MCU. Expectations were high for the introduction of this newest character, and Oscar Isaac delivered a performance that lived up to these expectations fully. Having to play two people in one, it is interesting to see how Isaac is able to interact with himself through the use of mirrors or reflective objects. Even though we know it is all the work of editors, Isaac’s performance pulls you in and makes you forget that he isn’t two separate people.

Steven Grant looks into a mirror and sees the reflection of Marc Spector. All of the interactions between the two characters have been through the use of mirrors and reflections. (Photo Taken From NPR.org)

Beyond the high-quality acting performances, the series is a refreshing shift from Marvel’s recent shows and movies because it is set in London and based around Egyptian mythology. It feels different from previous series’ in the way that it introduces a whole new mythology. 

Both Isaac and the series’ antagonist Arthur Harrow (Ethan Hawke) are avatars for Egyptian deities who pursue justice in different ways. Harrow believes in serving justice to those destined for evil before any wrong has been done, attacking the root of the problem. On the other hand, Steven Grant’s avatar Khonshu believes in dealing justice to those who have already committed evil.

The show deals with contrasting viewpoints in an interesting way, because it presents Harrow’s faith in a compelling and understandable way despite the fact that he is willing the seemingly innocent to prevent future evil. At the same time, Khonshu’s ideas are also presented in a rather negative light; he believes in justice and vengeance and kills to achieve his goals.

Arthur Harrow walks through a group of his loyal supporters. Harrow is the avatar of Ammit, an Egyptian deity whose power he uses to deal out judgment. (Photo Taken From ComicBook.com)

With four episodes left, it’s hard to say where this series will lead. The end of episode two showed Grant losing control of his body to Spector, making us wonder if even the protagonist will be an antagonist to himself. The move from London to Egypt leaves viewers with even more questions as to what direction the series will go in, but it’s safe to say that the skilled acting and a fascinating plot will continue throughout.