The Democratic Candidates

Who’s who... and who’s doing what

The long-awaited 2020 presidential primary elections are now in full swing. The race began with 29 Democratic candidates but has been narrowed down to six significant hopefuls. 

As of the 24th of February, there have been two caucuses in Iowa and Nevada, as well as the New Hampshire primary. Of the three, Senator Bernie Sanders has stood out as a clear frontrunner. Sanders came in with a 26.3% in Iowa (tying with candidate Pete Buttigieg), winning with 25.7% in New Hampshire, and crushing the competition with a whopping 46.8% win in Nevada. The prospects of the other five candidates are mixed. 

Photo Taken From thetop10news.com
Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders stands with Alexandria Ocasio Cortez House Representative of New York’s 14 district at his rally in Iowa. This rally turned out to be extremely successful and in the weeks following he has become the Democratic frontrunner.

Joseph Biden- Biden’s prospects plummeted in recent weeks, but the former vice president remains a strong candidate at Sanders’ heels. His policies appeal to moderate voters as he focuses on improving public health care and reentering the Paris climate accord, a step in reestablishing the United States as a leader in world affairs. 

Michael Bloomberg- Placing third in national polls, Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, and a business-friendly centrist has been experiencing a great amount of controversy over his campaign. Skipping the early states, he has spent half a billion dollars of his own money advertising his campaign leading up to Super Tuesday, the largest and most influential primary date. Along with his late start, self-funded campaign, status as the twelfth richest man in the world, and extensive allegations of gender discrimination and harassment, he has emerged as an antagonist to more liberal candidates. 

Elizabeth Warren- Warren is arguably the candidate with the most well-articulated views. She holds a strong belief in the power of the federal government to do good and advocates for the expansion of welfare and environmental protection programs like most Democrats. Unlike her competitors, Warren has published a number of detailed outlines for the implementation of her plans, a step ahead of other candidates. Despite her strong pre-primary numbers, she’s trailing behind her competitors.

How some of the leading candidate’s political views compare. Bernie Sanders sits closest to the far left, Mike Bloomberg sitting closest to moderate political viewpoints.

Pete Buttigieg- Pete Buttigieg, a political greenhorn, whose primary experience consists of being the Mayor of Indiana’s fourth-largest city, Southbend, has emerged as a surprisingly strong contender after his win in the chaotic Iowa caucus, the first primary of the nomination process. While unpopular with minorities and other key Democratic demographic groups, Buttigieg has attracted strong support from wealthy donors. Along with this support, Buttigieg is also making history as the first openly gay person to run for president. 

Bernie Sanders- The independent senator from Vermont, Sanders has gone from being an outsider underdog to the projected Democratic nominee. His beliefs range much further left on the political spectrum than traditional democratic candidates. Sanders’ plans for a presidential term revolve less so around improvements and refinements and more about revolutionary transformation. He is a leading supporter of Representative Alexandria Ocasio Cortez’s green new deal, a plan that restructures the economy to counteract the climate crisis. 

All eyes are on Sanders during the upcoming primaries, but the closeness of the race makes it seem as if it’s anyone’s game.